How and When You Should Post on Twitter

I remember when I first signed up for my professional Twitter @HSWriting. I had a very old (and dusty) personal Twitter I tried to use years ago to communicate with my favorite authors and radio stations. I didn’t get much feedback and all of my friends were on Facebook, so I abandoned it. When I signed up my professional Twitter, I knew the rules of how to use it for marketing and all the best things to do. Still, that blank box was glaring at me as I nervously sat down to compose my first Tweet.

3944080951_3d143dba3c

No matter how much you know or don’t know about Twitter, first starting a new account is daunting. One of the most asked questions is, “How much should I Tweet and when should I Tweet to get noticed?” There is a balancing act on Twitter you have to perform between being nonexistent, being annoying with too many updates, and being the model Twitter user. To help you out, I am going to explain when and how you should post on Twitter.

Disclaimer: The “best times” to post on Twitter depend when YOUR audience is online. When you first start out, you can follow my recommendations, but after a couple of months of engagement, you need to get analytics on when your Tweets get the most engagement and optimize your posts for that. Tweriod is a great tool to get a free Twitter analysis. It will tell you the general time frame and exact hours you should be Tweeting.

On Twitter, the most you really should share is 14 times a day on weekdays. On weekends, post no more than seven times a day. Of course, this rule can be broken occasionally, but try to stick to that number as much as possible. Also, never send out an individual Tweet more than once an hour. It is okay to converse with other users more than once an hour, but when sending out individual Tweets, keep it limited.

twett-frequency

The Social Bakers did an analytic study where they took thousands of Tweets from top brands and figured out how many Tweets gave them the most engagement. They noticed after the third Tweet, engagement rapidly declined. However, these big brands also have a lot more followers. Three Tweets is sufficient to get them engagement, but you might need to do a little more to get the attention of followers scrolling through their feed. Once you get going, I recommend about five individual Tweets per day. Still hold conversations and comment on other content, but stick to five individual Tweets a day from your brand.

Here is a good rule of thumb to avoid being annoying – post to be informative rather than to be noticed. I get it, you want people to follow you, comment on, and share your content. We all do! That doesn’t share everything you can find. Only share content if it is informative or helpful to your audience.

Advertisements

How to Use Twitter for Customer Service Without Tarnishing Your Brand Reputation

The Twitter platform is a very useful communication tool for your business. Companies use Twitter to get new customers and connect with the old ones. However, not many companies consider the importance of Twitter for customer service. Many people want to communicate on Twitter and sometimes it is to question or complain about your product or service. Some companies ignore customer requests on Twitter to avoid drawing negative attention to their brand. This is the wrong step to take. Instead, here are some ways to manage customer service on Twitter while still making your brand look awesome.

Via Flickr DigitalRalph

Via Flickr DigitalRalph

Respond Quickly

Try to respond within 24 hours. The less time you take to respond, the better. This is the same rule that goes for any customer service interaction, but many companies take days to make contact after an initial communication request from the customer. Your customer have chosen to communicate via Twitter because they thought they would get a faster response on that platform. Show them how attentive you are to their problem by quickly responding.

Via Flickr Warren Sukernek

Via Flickr Warren Sukernek

Use Empathy and Acknowledgement

Don’t be a Twitter robot! Make sure you tell them you are sorry about their problem or understanding their frustration. Acknowledge the problem before trying to solve it for them as well. When you take these steps, you are showing that you care about their customer and their experience with your brand. You are also indicating you did read their entire problem and did your research about how to fix it.

Via Flickr Book Work Laser & Design

Via Flickr Book Work Laser & Design

Don’t Redirect Them

People are choosing to communicate with your company on Twitter because that is their preferred method of communication. Asking them to visit the store, call, email, or get on another social media platform is inconvenient for them. They want their problem solved now and through the initial way of communicating. Answer their question or complaint entirely on Twitter. This can be tricky since you only have 140 characters, but brevity is your friend here.

Via Flickr Trey Pennington

Via Flickr Trey Pennington

Try to Resolve the Issue in One Tweet

I know you think I am crazy. But if your company can solve any issue in under 140 characters, your customers will have an amazing impression of your customer service. When you read about their problem entirely, do your research before responding, and give a perfect solution in few characters, you are taking up very little of your customer’s time and resolving their issue with ease. Evidence of your excellent customer service stays on Twitter as well, showing others how easy it is to communicate with you therefore giving them confidence in your brand.

Choosing a Twitter Tone for Your Brand

Twitter is a great platform to perfect your social media branding for your business. Part of creating a brand using Twitter as a marketing tool is getting the tone in your Tweets right. There are three kinds of tones that work for your Twitter brand – fun, informative, and helpful.

Social media experts say it is best to pick two of these tones for your Tweets in order to create a brand voice. Many businesses think they need to be fun and light hearted on Twitter when they actually should stick to the identity of their brand. There are a few things to keep in mind when establishing your brand’s tone on Twitter.

Via Flickr Jared W. Smith

Via Flickr Jared W. Smith

Twitter is a Branding Exercise

Most companies already have a brand identity. However, on Twitter the brand gets an opportunity to express itself. This is why it is important to decide the tone of your Tweets. Brands are usually constructed very formally. Before making a brief, the brand has to go through a process where clear and strategic guidelines are presented. This is difficult to follow, however, when you are trying to communicate in a conversational tone on Twitter.

When preparing a brand tone for Twitter, the company needs to talk about the brand’s personality and human characteristics. The voice needs to reflect the personality of the brand in sounding human. Maybe you can have a representative send personalized Tweets and photos out on Twitter to make the brand communicate casually. Or you can create a character that represents the brand on Twitter. There are many creative approaches to take when establishing a brand voice.

Via Flickr philcampbell

Via Flickr philcampbell

Don’t Be Influenced by Community Peer Pressure

Some brands see the demographic of their audience on Twitter and try to imitate the way they communicate. This is a bad idea. At the end of the day, you always need to stick to your brand’s identity. Sometimes companies think that a person will protect them from negative comments about their brand, but it only comes across as inauthentic.

There is no need to put on a mask that is different from your brand in order to communicate with your audience. Most people do not want to become friends with their brands, much like most people are not friends with their parents. Instead, they want to be able to establish a dialogue with a brand they enjoy using.

Via Flickr philcampbell

Via Flickr philcampbell

Twitter is More Than an RSS Feed

Your Twitter account for your brand is a platform that allows your brand to become human and communicate with an audience. It is not a place to post a series of links to products, website pages, or news about your brand. While it is okay to post links occasionally, you need to have a real person post the links with commentary that gives it context. Use Twitter as an opportunity to show a behind the scenes look at your brand and start a discussion about your brand on the internet. It is always a great way to communicate with and get to know your audience, building a loyal following. Let an RSS feed do its work and keep Twitter as a communication tool.

Via Flickr IssacMao

Via Flickr IssacMao

Find Out How You Would Like to Use Twitter to Communicate

Before you can establish a voice, you need to decide how your brand will best communicate on Twitter. Establish what the marketing goal of Twitter will be for the brand and post valuable content that achieves that. For example, a Twitter can be used to increase brand awareness and engagement. Ask questions to your audience, start a hashtag contest or discussion, and post photos that will help increase brand awareness.

Don’t just talk about all of your products and services. Share your passion for your brand in multiple ways, not just talking about yourself. For instance, if you sell cameras, post a photo one of your employees took with a camera or post an article about the joys of photographing.

Which brands do you think have the best Twitter tone? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @HS_Writing! Personally, I like Taco Bell’s college friend tone.