The Quick and Dirty Guide to Pinterest Marketing

“Why do I even need a Pinterest?”

Because images rule.

Via Flickr Pink Sherbert Photography

Via Flickr Pink Sherbert Photography

 

They are an easy way to communicate your message to followers in a way they actually remember. It makes your marketing more interesting and exciting for potential clients/customers. And it gives you another avenue to get higher search engine rankings. The platform is unlike any other and takes some adjustment, but once you know the rules and strategies, you can add Pinterest to your marketing scheme.

  • Don’t just add your content. Repin other’s stuff too.
  • Follow users who can provide high quality content for your page and that meet your brand goals and expectations.
  • Make the images you pin or repin high resolution. No watermarks allowed.
  • Organize your content into specific categories using the boards feature. You can be REALLY specific. This helps users easily navigate through your content.
  • When you link images you pin, make sure followers are taken to the exact content your image is about. If you pin a recipe using the barbecue sauce your company makes, take them to the recipe, not the homepage of the company website. This will frustrate users and cause them to tell on you to the Pinterest gods.
  • Speaking of tattle telling, you need to start doing it. Report broken links, spam posts, or images that are not appropriate. This helps keep Pinterest a good, usable platform for your marketing plan.
  • Advertise. Put a Pinterest button on your website. Talk about your Pinterest account on other social media profiles. Link to photos on your Pinterest on all accounts. Let your followers know you are on Pinterest so they can interact with you.

Any questions? Comment below or Tweet me @HS_Writing.

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How to Track Your Pinterest Success

If you are like me, then measuring analytics on your social media accounts is slightly confusing and a pain in the rear. Among the many wonderful things about Pinterest, they make tracking your analytics a breeze. This may in part be contributed to the fact most users on Pinterest are actively purchasing items they see on the platform. You want to know exactly how your followers are interacting with your Pinterest account so you can see how to best market on the platform to raise your profits. Start tracking these metrics using your Pinterest Analytics tool to get a grasp on how to best use your Pinterest.

Averages

You should start tracking your average repins, likes, and comments per pin. You should also keep track of your average second degree followers using the analytics on Pinterest. The second degree followers tells you how well your brand connected to a followers’ base. This means you will see how many followers each of your followers has and how many of them have interacted with your brand.

Engagement

The engagement percentage will explain how many of your followers have actively engaged with each of your pins and repins. You can also look at the short term engagement, which will rapidly fluctuate. It is mostly used to measure how effective changes to your Pinterest brand strategy are. You also want to measure velocity, or the average number of pins and repins your brand makes each week. Test out different rates of pinning and repinning and figure out how many pins gives you the most engagement. The best way to measure velocity is to looka t the short term follower engagement. Whichever test gives you the most engagement, use that number from now on.

Reach

Your reach will show how far your brand has been able to touch new followers across Pinterest. It tracks the number of unique impressions you will receive each time you pin or repin content. Impressions are the number of times pins from your brand were seen each day on Pinterest. You can also look at the reach of each individual pin to see how many people saw it on Pinterest that day. Figure out which kind of pins have had the most reach and try to replicate those kinds. Make sure to look at how many clicks each of these pins are getting as well. The types with the most clicks are ones you want to focus on pinning in the future.

Mosts

Your “mosts” metrics include your most recent, most repinned, and most clicked. The most recent pin feed will show the pins from your brand that were most recently pinned by other users. This metric will give you an idea of what followers want to see certain times of the day. The most repinned feed shows you the pins that have been pinned the most from the brand. The most clicked feed will show the pins that have been clicked through the most from your brand. Pay attention to those clicks! You want future content to resemble what has been clicked through the most.

Tops

Your “tops” metrics include the top fans and influencers, top pins, and top interactions. The top fans and influencers list is going to be your VIPs. They are the users following your brand that have the most followers and engagement on their own profiles. Reach out to those people and talk about exchanging guest pin boards or teaming up in some other fashion. Top pins are the pins from your brand that have received the most engagement. The top interactions shows how much interaction pins from your brand’s website have had on the platform. The last two will give you a great idea of what works and what doesn’t work in your Pinterest strategy.

Still confusing? Here is a handy dandy infographic found on Social Media Today to help you out!

17-pinterest-metrics-every-brand-should-track